Harrell – Woody

1st, 2nd, and 358th place for the USA – Woody Harrell (April 16, 1973)

Posted on Jan 22, 2016 in 1973, Harrell - Woody, M 18 - 34, Maryland

1st, 2nd, and 358th place for the USA – Woody Harrell (April 16, 1973)

First, a little background: My so-called road racing career began in fits and starts; but the initial date is easy to pin down: the day I read an article in the June 01, 1964, issue of Sports Illustrated about American expatriate Buddy Edelen. Unnoticed by most Americans, Edelen had run the first- and third-fastest marathons of all time, and had just returned from England to win the US Olympic marathon trial at Yonkers, New York, by over 20 minutes. I was fascinated! I was amazed. I was inspired! So much so  I put on my tennis shoes (literally my tennis shoes; who had a pair of running shoes...

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“America’s Good Luck Charm” – Woody Harrell (April 21, 2014)

Posted on Feb 27, 2015 in 2014, Harrell - Woody, M 65 - 69, Mississippi

“America’s Good Luck Charm” – Woody Harrell (April 21, 2014)

In July 1978, I finished third in the Grandfather Mountain Marathon (described as “among the most strenuous marathons in the nation”), just barely reaching my goal of under three hours. As I circled toward the finish line on the track at the Southern Highland Games, I was certain I was in fourth place. However, way up ahead of me, a running buddy of mine had made a wrong turn and was off course by a mile and a half before he discovered his error, a mistake, he was not able to overcome. It was the only time I ever came close to a marathon podium placement, so none the less, I happily...

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A Spot on the Second Row – Woody Harrell (April 21, 1975)

Posted on Feb 12, 2015 in 1975, Harrell - Woody, M 18 - 34, North Carolina

A Spot on the Second Row – Woody Harrell (April 21, 1975)

There are days when everything just seems to fall in place. For me, Monday, April 21, 1975, was one such day, although there was a good bit of worrying on my part as it was unfolding. After the debacle that was my first Boston race, I bounced back pretty quickly. Six weeks later I was out of the army and, aided by the GI Bill, heading back to grad school to resume life as a “professional student.” Six months later, I cut over 20 minutes off my previous best, good enough for tenth place in the first marathon ever run in the nation’s capital. I decided to skip Boston in ’74 and...

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